Visualizing Mythology: Using Universal Design for Learning to Teach Greek Mythology 

HHDem
Sketch note of Homeric Hymn to Demeter. CC-BY Alison Innes @InnesAlison

The Classical Association of Canada/Société Canadienne des Études Classiques
McMaster University
7 May 2019

Lianne Fisher, Centre for Pedagogical Innovation, Brock University
Email: lfisher@brocku.ca
Twitter: @liannefisher

Alison Innes, Brock University
Email: ainnes@brocku.ca
Twitter: @innesalison

The relationship between learning, note taking and class preparation is not always articulated, or explicitly taught to students. These skills can be challenging to teach along with course content in introductory classes. Our recent redesign of a first-year mythology course sought to introduce students to a variety of note taking skills, while practicing close reading and textual analysis.

By incorporating the idea of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), we encouraged students to engage with various methods of organizing information including Cornell notes, annotating text, and sketchnoting. Over the course of the semester, students practiced visual note taking skills alongside traditional written responses in weekly assignments. Such assignments challenged students to translate their knowledge of a text into a non-textual format, challenging and deepening their learning experience. Visual note taking is a natural fit for the teaching of mythology, as myths were experienced in audio and visual formats in the ancient world, through storytelling, art, and theatre.

A key part of UDL is allowing students the opportunity to demonstrate their learning beyond the traditional essay format. Students were given the option to submit their final essay as a visual essay. We developed clear assessment guidelines to ensure such assignments were equally rigorous to written essays. A selection of these were digitized and displayed in the university library, allowing students to participate in the production and mobilization of scholarship. With the students’ permission we will share some of these educational artefacts in this session.

Key to the success of the course was supporting the Teaching Assistant team. Through a series of workshops, TAs had the opportunity to learn ways in which they could model information organization strategies in the classroom. This provided first-year graduate student TAs the opportunity to engage critically with pedagogy.

Acknowledgements

  • Dr. Anton Jansen, Instructor, Brock University Department of Classics
  • Darrin Sunstrum, Course Coordinator, Brock University Department of Classics
  • Giulia Forsythe, Associate Director, Brock University Centre for Pedagogical Innovation
  • Teaching Assistants and students of CLAS 1P95, Fall 2017

Download slideshow PDF

Alison’s Cornell Note Resources

Worksheet: Timeline

Worksheet: Comparison

Worksheet: Annotating Text

Visual Essay Assignment Instructions

Visual Essay Reflection

A Note About Note Taking

Finally got around to replacing my Apple iPencil and what better way to try it out than creating a sketch note– about note taking? This is my attempt to show how visual note taking can be combined with the Cornell Note system.

To learn more about sketch notes, try Sketchnote Army by Mark Rohde, Mauro Toselli, Steve Silbert, and Bineabi Akah. They even do a podcast about sketchnotes!

Links to download the PDF version of this note and to a PDF version of the unlined template are below. As always, CC-BY, so enjoy, share, use, remix, pass it along!

And if you find it particularly useful, let me know in the comments or on Twitter at @InnesAlison– I would love to hear from you!

Note_Taking_Tips

(And yes, note taking should be written as two words– that’s an error just to see who’s paying attention 😉 )

Download Tips for Effective Note Taking PDF (Jan. 2018)

Download Cornell Notes template (unlined) PDF

 

More About Cornell Notes

I’ve been doing some updates and expansions of my note-taking notes and am sharing my Cornell notes here for anyone who would like to use them. All are CC-BY. Download links for PDF versions are listed at the bottom of this post.

Cornell Notes

Download Quick Guide to Cornell Notes PDF Jan. 2018

Download Cornell Notes: A Quick and Dirty Guide (original) Oct. 2017

Cornell Notes template (lined) PDF

Cornell Notes template (unlined) PDF

Cornell Notes: A quick and dirty guide

Wow, who would have thought a tweet about Cornell Notes would prove so popular?

But since it is now my most popular tweet ever, I’m making my guide available for download and use with a CC attribution license.
Cornell Notes Quick & Dirty Guide

A quick Google for “Cornell Notes templates” reveals hundreds of online templates. I mashed up the best (in my opinion!) into my version.
Cornell Notes Blank Template 

Additional Tips:

  • Keep a 3″ x 11″ strip of cardstock or heavy paper in your notebook or binder to draw your margins quickly on the go.
  • Need more space for reviewing? Do your note taking on only side of the page. Then, use the back of the previous page for mind maps, sketch notes, questions, etc.
  • Are you a lefty? You may find reversing the columns more your liking (HT to @DarrinSunstrum for that!)

Further Resources:

I would love to hear how you use these and your experiences with using and teaching Cornell Notes!

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